Nancy Mannebach

3 years ago
I thoroughly enjoyed the discussion on scrapping the corporate income tax and the suggested tax increase of shareholders. It seemed very pragmatic in addressing the dilemma of double taxation that most corporations face.

The difficulty that struck me really rooted in the lack of tax payments from foreigners. This idea that you can tax shareholders, whether that be everyday citizens that own shares in a corporation, or executives with extremely profitable stock options, this idea that you can tax Americans so exponentially really strikes me. Let's say you kept the shareholder's tax rates relatively normal, as explained, the contribution to the economy would be minimal if there is one at all in bringing money back into the U.S. economy to help our deficit/budget problem.

I think it's very interesting to see at what the optimal level of taxing our country's millionaires are. All taxes combined, what is the optimal point, according to the Laffer curve, that you could tax (particularly our country's 1%) before they start to work less, or in your case move to a different country. I think its underestimated how much the wealthy value their income/money. Take a look at France. With such high tax rates, they have one of the lowest numbers of millionaires of any developed country, having surpassed the optimal taxation point on the Laffer curve.

We can tax shareholders, this would probably push a whole lot more pressure on executives who own millions worth of stocks annually. I think whats underestimated is how volatile their indifference is to moving to another country. With how the tax will affect our economy, I feel as if it would cost the middle class more than anything.

Even if this reform reverses this inversion and brings companies back to the U.S., is it still practical if it doesn't close the gap in the loss of government revenue to our country AND it forces wealthy individuals out of our country-losing their tax revenue in the process?
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3 years ago
I thoroughly enjoyed the discussion on scrapping the corporate income tax and the suggested tax increase of shareholders. It seemed very pragmatic in addressing the dilemma of double taxation that most corporations face.

The difficulty that struck me really rooted in the lack of tax payments from foreigners. This idea that you can tax shareholders, whether that be everyday citizens that own shares in a corporation, or executives with extremely profitable stock options, this idea that you can tax Americans so exponentially really strikes me. Let's say you kept the shareholder's tax rates relatively normal, as explained, the contribution to the economy would be minimal if there is one at all in bringing money back into the U.S. economy to help our deficit/budget problem.

I think it's very interesting to see at what the optimal level of taxing our country's millionaires are. All taxes combined, what is the optimal point, according to the Laffer curve, that you could tax (particularly our country's 1%) before they start to work less, or in your case move to a different country. I think its underestimated how much the wealthy value their income/money. Take a look at France. With such high tax rates, they have one of the lowest numbers of millionaires of any developed country, having surpassed the optimal taxation point on the Laffer curve.

We can tax shareholders, this would probably push a whole lot more pressure on executives who own millions worth of stocks annually. I think whats underestimated is how volatile their indifference is to moving to another country. With how the tax will affect our economy, I feel as if it would cost the middle class more than anything.

Even if this reform reverses this inversion and brings companies back to the U.S., is it still practical if it doesn't close the gap in the loss of government revenue to our country AND it forces wealthy individuals out of our country-losing their tax revenue in the process?
See more

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